Table of Contents Rapier

Wayne Rapier interview 4/12/1977 and 5/3/1977

Page 1

From 1951-54 while in the Marine Band WR studied with Tabuteau – private lessons and in woodwind ensemble.

Tabuteau’s sense of humor and standards.

Tabuteau’s dogmatism.

1-2

Tabuteau’s most important idea in one word: flexibility.

2

Up and down impulses.

Intensity or motion in the sound composed of 3 different things: vibrato, speed of the wind, and pitch.

Tabuteau in France.

2-3

Vibrato.

3

Numbers.

Embouchure and reed placement.

Dolce tone.

3-4

Zero.

4  

Articulation: tonguing and slurs.

Scaling of articulation.

The end of the slur

5

Breathing.

Tabuteau recommended not filling up completely with air.

Support; weight on toes.

Tabuteau spent hours on 1 phrase.

The numbers were for lesser days.

5/3/1977

6

Ups and downs: Brahms Symphony #1 – first solo in movement 1.

Relationship of ups and downs and dynamics: Brahms Violin Concerto slow movement opening oboe solo.

Deafening pianissimo.

The bar line in the oboe solo of the slow movement of Brahms Violin Concerto, and in general.

7

The “down” is where you’re going and then you relax.

Syncopations and dotted notes.

7-8

Beethoven’s Eroica slow movement, first oboe solo, first three notes.

8

Beethoven’s 7th Symphony.

Comments on: “ it is important to remember to place one’s notes on the bow or the wind and not bow or wind the notes.”

Rubato – what Robert Bloom called “fancy robbery.”

8-9

Reed making.

9  

Tabuteau’s influences.

Set the standard of oboe playing.

Many prominent woodwind players call Tabuteau their teacher.

Influence on the Philadelphia Orchestra.

Combination of Stokowski and Tabuteau.

10  

Envious of string players; modeled some concepts after string playing.

Intervals.

Character of phrases.

11  

Teaching numbers.

Vibrato’s relationship to the numbers.

Groupings; joint-finger-wrist-arm analogy.

Bar lines ignored.

Getting rid of excess air through the nose.

Special breathing techniques: less air and more support.